Moments – When I saw the nuns… bang, the moment, period.

“When I saw the nuns, I thought it was an unusual group. I’ve never seen so many nuns together. That would make a nice shot. Then as I got close, it was difficult. I was being jostled. People were all around me. I have a Roloflex, and dangling. So, I had to be careful what the best shot I could get. It’s one shot I’ve always been proud of, because everything worked. Everything came together. And bang, the moment, period.” – Morrie Markoff

Los Angeles Times – A life in Pictures: 99-year-old photographer looks back

Morrie Markoff hasn’t been bored “one minute in my life,” he told LA Times columnist Steve Lopez. The LA-based photographer has raised a family, run a business, created art and cheated death in his 99 years – and captured much of it. Read more about Morrie: Thriving 99-year-old is right at home in today’s lively downtown L.A.

 

“If you love photography, shoot pictures. Keep shooting pictures. You’ll beging to notice a difference when you first started and two years later. Some people look, but they don’t see. Keep shooting pictures. That’s all.” – Morrie Markoff

How many stories in an ordinary moment?

 

 

Everywhere we go, everywhere we look, there is so much more to what we see than we can take in, process, and remember. Life is made of stories. Even in an ordinary moment such as this, there is more than one subject. We observe that there are children in the foreground, people milling about in the background. They are in a certain place , all doing different activities, looking different directions. There are hints about who they are by who they are with, what they are doing, what they carry with them or have near them.

I know for a fact that the bicycle belongs to Cape Cleare Salmon; it is one way they deliver fresh salmon around town. I can tell you that this is a farmers market, and that the girls are listening to music. I overheard they are visiting with family from California, and they don’t want the sun to come out. I can tell you that this photo was taken in a town in the Pacific Northwest. The rest is now left up to your imagination… isn’t that what we mostly do when we people-watch.

With a photo, we capture a moment but give ourselves as many opportunities as we wish to look and reflect upon it again. If it’s a image with people, like this one, we have time to find more clues as to who we think they are , that is, how we chose to think of them based on the information we gather. One of the best outcomes is to learn more about ourselves, how we process visual information that comes through our eye-gate, even our other senses of smell and hearing, and our perceptions of those we encounter or view in a photograph.

As “ordinary” as this black and white image is… we can find one story or more stories, and with a little imagination craft an interesting one.

 

Here’s an image from my collection of street photography. What’s your first impression? Look again. One or more stories possible? Now what does your imagination beg you to write about these guys walking down the street?

 

Wanderer-1

“To me, photography is an art of observation. It’s about finding something interesting in an ordinary place… I’ve found it has little to do with the things you see and everything to do with the way you see them.” – Elliott Erwitt

 

Street Photography-Visual Storytelling

I have been so inspired by the street photography of Vivian Maier that I have taken my camera and begun walking the streets of my own home town to see what I can see, while getting some exercise. While approaching the intersection of 8th and Park, this young father with child caught my eye.

Here we have the same image, one color and one black and white. Click images to enlarge. How does color or the lack thereof affect your impression of this moment and overall scene? Of the two images, which one inspires your imagine the most and why? What impression or story is unfolding in your mind?