Moments: Megan Paska, BeeKeeper

Made by Hand / No 3 The Beekeeper from Made by Hand on Vimeo.

Megan Paska, Beekeeper

With a real sense of purpose and connected to the world, “local farmer Megan Paska has witnessed beekeeping as it morphed from an illegal habit to a sustainable, community-supported skill. Mirroring beekeeping’s own ascendance, she found more than just a living: “This is the first time in my life when I’ve just felt absolutely on the right path.”

A project from Bureau of Common Goods, Made by Hand is a new short film series celebrating the people who make things by hand—sustainably, locally, and with a love for their craft.

About Megan Paska, author of the Roof Top Beekeeper: She moved to Brooklyn, NY in 2006 by way of Baltimore, Md (her hometown). She was no stranger to growing food when she got here. Meg had been gardening in Maryland, her mother and grandmother had vegetable gardens and the rest of her family managed a 450-acre farmstead in rural Virginia where she would spend summers walking through the pastures and valleys picking Chicory and learning to appreciate the quiet.

Once settled in NYC, she found that her landlords were enthusiastic about having a little bit of dirt to dig around in. So, they tore down the ratty old swimming pool that occupied the backyard and put up a raised bed vegetable garden. Soon after came the bees and honey, then the chickens and fresh eggs. They raised rabbits for meat. They canned, pickled and brewed beer. They lived pretty darn well.

“We ought to do good to others as simply as a horse runs, or a bee makes honey, or a vine bears grapes season after season without thinking of the grapes it has borne.” Marcus Aurelius

Moments – Denial

Denial  

On December 30, 2012, after a one-hour trail run in the forests overlooking the Puget Sound, followed by a 75-minute Power Step class, I returned home, thankful for my strength, entered the kitchen pantry and took a lulu of a step.

The emergency room doctor returned with x-rays, shaking his head.

“No, this can’t happen now.  You see, I am in the process of moving from my house of 23 years and I have a major exhibition of my work opening in five days.”

“Look at me!” he said.

I was trying to bargain with the doctor, “This just can’t happen, especially now.”

“Look at me,” he repeated like a doctor.

I did, then eyed my bare and swelling and bruised legs.

“You have a broken left ankle and a foot broken in three places.”

Denial had kept me in my place in the Middle East, and now I was trying to get it to work in the Pacific Northwest and on my legs.  This time it was different…I couldn’t bargain with the fact that something was broken.

From 2006-2010 I lived and worked as an art professor at a women’s college in Kuwait.  I survived those years because for the most part, I denied the inequity of being a woman there and how it was breaking me. Two years later I published a book on this experience, Suitcase Filled with Nails: Lessons Learned from Teaching Art in Kuwait. In April 2013, it was republished by Booktrope Publishing and includes images that were featured in my exhibit I attended in a wheelchair.

Moments Contributor – Yvonne Pepin-Wakefield, artist and author of Suitcase Filled with Nails – Lessons Learned from Teaching Art in Kuwait

Let there be light.

 

MorningLight

 

Photography is the combination of the photographer’s eye, and light falling on a light sensitive surface or digital equivalent of film. And from this alchemy of human skill, experience, perceptions,  impressions and interactions with technology evolves visual storytelling – often evoking a feeling, which in turn stirs our senses and conjures up memories. What are your feelings and what comes to mind when you see this image?

Oddly enough for me, this image reminds me of when I was a young girl, and what it felt like to fall asleep on my bed under a pile of warm clothes fresh from the dryer with the sun streaming in through my bedroom window.

“When words become unclear, I shall focus with photographs. When images become inadequate, I shall be content with silence.”
― Ansel Adams

“You don’t make a photograph just with a camera. You bring to the act of photography all the pictures you have seen, the books you have read, the music you have heard, the people you have loved.”
― Ansel Adams

“The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera.”
― Dorothea Lange

“A good snapshot keeps a moment from running away.”
― Eudora Welty

“For me, the camera is a sketch book, an instrument of intuition and spontaneity.”
― Henri Cartier-Bresson

“Taking pictures is savoring life intensely, every hundredth of a second.”
― Marc Riboud