Capturing the Moment

Garry Winogrand‘s perfectly timed photo reminds me of the day I was photographing on the street and captured an unusual moment similar to his. See my image below Winogrand’s.

 

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Some of the” first impression” feedback I’ve received on my image above is that I caught this guy just as he fell, crashing to the ground, as in he’s fallen from a building. I admit it does look like that at first glance. In reality he was heading my direction with his companions, suddenly stopping on the sidewalk right in front of me, where I was standing in an alcove, and started breakdancing – one reason the image lacks clarity – the element of surprise! Rather than delete the image because it wasn’t sharp, I focused on the authenticity of moment. It is one of my favorite street photography images.

Photographer Eric Kim writes: ”

If you want to get a deeper insight into street photography and take better photos, I feel it is very important to study the work of the street photographers who came before us and paved the way for the rest of us. Not only that, but reading the quotes and words by these influential street photographers is a great way to train your mind to take better photos as well. Below are some of my favorite street photography quotes that are concise, inspirational, and have influenced me in one way or another.”

“I love the people I photograph. I mean, they’re my friends. I’ve never met most of them or I don’t know them at all, yet through my images I live with them.” – Bruce Gilden

After he unwound his tangled limbs and hopped up off the pavement, I got to know something about him, not as a subject but as a person. His name is Wanderer. He has a son by the name of Madison. He and his friends travel by box car around the country hopping off at towns along the way to leave their mark on the world – graffiti. I instantly liked him and his gang, who at first looked intimidating, but in reality turned out to be really sweet guys who shared a common passion. They were in no hurry to rush off, but hung around with me for a while talking with me about themselves as though we were friends reconnecting after a long absence and catching up. I suppose that to them, I was one of many people across the country that create a sense of community for  them wherever they go… one moment at a time, connected by thousands of miles of track.


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Moments – Denial

Denial  

On December 30, 2012, after a one-hour trail run in the forests overlooking the Puget Sound, followed by a 75-minute Power Step class, I returned home, thankful for my strength, entered the kitchen pantry and took a lulu of a step.

The emergency room doctor returned with x-rays, shaking his head.

“No, this can’t happen now.  You see, I am in the process of moving from my house of 23 years and I have a major exhibition of my work opening in five days.”

“Look at me!” he said.

I was trying to bargain with the doctor, “This just can’t happen, especially now.”

“Look at me,” he repeated like a doctor.

I did, then eyed my bare and swelling and bruised legs.

“You have a broken left ankle and a foot broken in three places.”

Denial had kept me in my place in the Middle East, and now I was trying to get it to work in the Pacific Northwest and on my legs.  This time it was different…I couldn’t bargain with the fact that something was broken.

From 2006-2010 I lived and worked as an art professor at a women’s college in Kuwait.  I survived those years because for the most part, I denied the inequity of being a woman there and how it was breaking me. Two years later I published a book on this experience, Suitcase Filled with Nails: Lessons Learned from Teaching Art in Kuwait. In April 2013, it was republished by Booktrope Publishing and includes images that were featured in my exhibit I attended in a wheelchair.

Moments Contributor – Yvonne Pepin-Wakefield, artist and author of Suitcase Filled with Nails – Lessons Learned from Teaching Art in Kuwait

Paper Bag Hats by moses

It was nine years ago, while visiting the Mingei International Museum in Escondido California, that I viewed the collection “Crowning Glory” – Paper Bag Hats by moses. I was absolutely fascinated by his creativity recycling paper bags into extraordinary works of art. For some reason, I’ve had moses’ quirky and haute couture millinery creations on my mind this past week, so I decided to see what images I could find online to share with you, so you can enjoy them for yourself.

“Moses created more than 250 hats from paper bags contributed by merchants in his Hawaiian neighborhood. Made in a project room of the local library during the 1980s, the hats are imaginative, amusing and timeless sculpture.

Moses eventually gave up making hats, he had developed tendinitis or carpel tunnel. Living in a van along the shores of Oahu prompted him to donate these to the Mingei International Museum, Escondido, California.” View Laura Reilly’s Photo Stream of more Paper Bag Hats by Moses.

Read the brief article The Bag Hatter – artistic paper bag hats by Moses by Dona Z. Meilach.

“The Sun Rook hat alone (lower right image) took over 100 paper bags to create.” Jaime Zollars – Paper Forest

It pays to keep searching. I eventually stumbled upon moses’ daughter’s website. Kira Od, an artist and sculptor, has 255 images posted on her site of her father’s paper bag hats. All but thirteen hats were photographed by moses. All of moses’ hat have names. I would love to know the story behind each hat, their names and the local people modeling them, but we are left to using our imagination to create our own stories from his astonishing creations. Click on the photo below to enter Kira’s photo collection of Paper Bag Hats by moses.